Philosophy & Applied Ethics

Philosophy & Applied Ethics

 

Head of Department – Mrs S. Godfrey

 

The Vision

AUDE SAPERE

…The school’s motto, ‘Dare to be wise’, is the challenge that lies at the very heart of Philosophy & Applied Ethics here at TBGS.

Students follow a carefully constructed programme of study which weaves together key aspects of Philosophy, Ethics, Citizenship, PSHE and Religious Education whilst developing pupils’ personal learning and thinking skills.

It is the department’s aim that all students be equipped with the necessary knowledge-base and skills to think through issues and ideas in an informed, confident and creative way. Students are viewed as holisitic life-learners and their behaviour is seen to be symptomatic of their thinking. Therefore, the root of their decisions and actions is explored and discussed.

Students undertake a journey of learning and discovery where they are empowered to become independent thinkers who can make ongoing cross-curricular links and develop their own worldview as well as becoming sensitive to the ideas and opinions of others.

A Philosophy & Applied Ethics graduate from TBGS should feel equipped to take on the challenges of living in our modern-day global society and to have an understanding of their own identity on an individual, local, national and international level.

It is hoped that they will fulfil their potential in all areas of their life and truly live life to the full. 

The start of the journey

Pupils enter TBGS with a range of experiences relating to Philosophy & Applied Ethics which we aim to discover and draw upon.

Key Stage 3

Our Key Stage 3 curriculum is taught through a range of big questions and themes…

Year 7: four modules, three 60-minute sessions per fortnight

  • What’s the Big Idea? (includes a short course in Mindfulness techniques)
  • Who Am I?
  • What is Philosophy?
  • What is Religion?

Year 8: three modules, three 60-minute sessions per fortnight

  • What is a Human?
  • Good and Evil
  • The Holocaust

Year 9: three modules, three 60-minute sessions per fortnight

  • What is Truth?
  • Contemporary Moral Issues
  • A Study of Islam: Beliefs and Teachings (EDUQAS GCSE Religious Studies, Component 3)


GCSE Religious Studies
Head of Department – Mrs S. Godfrey
Examination Board: WJEC Eduqas – Religious, Philosophical and Ethical Studies (Route A)*

 

GCSE Religious Studies offers an academic qualification recognised by universities and employers. For those interested in working with people, especially in Law, Journalism, Medicine, Teaching and Personnel Management, Religious Studies offers an opportunity to explore the major beliefs and social/moral problems of our time.  Important, and sometimes quite sensitive issues, will be addressed providing pupils with an opportunity for personal growth and development. Many employers value the flexibility of thought and the capacity of marshalling arguments in a coherent and compelling manner which the study of RS nurtures. The specification is designed to be accessible to students of any religious tradition, or none.

SPECIFICATION AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

GCSE Religious Studies should encourage students to be inspired, moved and changed by following a broad, satisfying and worthwhile course of study that challenges them and equips them to lead constructive lives in the modern world.

The course will enable learners to:

  • deepen their understanding of the relationship between people
  • become informed about common and divergent views within traditions in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the fact that religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian
  • understand that religious traditions in Great Britain are diverse and include the following religions: Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, as well as non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

The course takes a distinctive issues-based approach to the study of religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world. It will also enable learners to gain knowledge and understanding of two religions.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

A01: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief*, including:

  • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
  • influence on individuals, communities and societies
  • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs

A02: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief*, including their significance

and influence

[ *The term ‘belief’ includes religious and non-religious beliefs as appropriate to the

subject content requirements]


IB PHILOSOPHY
Contact Person – Mrs S. Godfrey
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS  

Grade 6 in English Language and/or grade 6 in Religious Studies. Also essential is an open and enquiring mind.

COURSE AIMS & OBJECTIVES

The IB Philosophy programme deals with issues that are profound, complex and challenging for humanity. It aims to be inclusive and to tackle a wide range of issues from a philosophical perspective. The course explores the fundamental questions that people have asked since the beginning of time, and confronts new problems arising within contemporary society…

What exists? What is it to be a human being? What can we know? How do I know what is the right thing to do?

These questions are explored through an examination of themes and texts.

Critical analysis, coherent thought, careful decision-making and clear presentation are important skills for Philosophy but also in themselves. They serve as valuable preparation for many careers.

At the end of the course it is hoped that each student will be able to think independently and will have a respect for reasoned argument. Many employers value flexibility of thought and the capacity of marshalling arguments in a coherent and compelling manner which this course offers. Students tend to follow a career in the following areas:

Law, Medicine, Accountancy, Commerce and Industry, Business Management, Journalism, Civil Service, Teaching, Politics, Research.

Philosophy is welcomed and valued by many professions.

COURSE CONTENT

PAPER 1:         

Core Theme

  • What is a human being?
  • An exploration of the human condition

(Higher & Standard Level)

Optional Theme(s)

  • Philosophy of Religion (Higher & Standard Level)
  • Theories & Problems of Ethics (Higher Level only)

PAPER 2: The Prescribed Text

A study of Plato’s Republic (Higher & Standard Level)

PAPER 3: The Unseen Text

(Higher Level only)

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT

A philosophical analysis of non-philosophical material (2,000 words)

(Higher & Standard Level)

STYLE OF TEACHING/DETAILS OF ASSESSMENT

Throughout the course the emphasis will be on ‘doing’ philosophy which requires intellectual rigour, an open and critical mind, and a willingness to attempt to understand alternative views. At the core of philosophy lies a concern with truth and clarity of understanding achieved through critical analysis and systematic thinking, careful analysis of arguments and close reading. A personal perspective will be encouraged and developed over the two years.

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

HIGHER LEVEL

External Assessment (80%)

Paper 1, Paper 2, Paper 3

Internal Assessment (Coursework – 20%)

STANDARD LEVEL

External Assessment (75%)

Paper 1, Paper 2

Internal Assessment (Coursework – 25%)


A-LEVEL PHILOSOPHY
Head of Department – Mrs S. Godfrey
EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS

AQA: Advanced Level in Philosophy (7172)

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Grade 6 in English Language and/or grade 6 in Religious Studies. Also essential is an open and enquiring mind.

COURSE AIMS & OBJECTIVES

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the key methods and concepts in philosophy through the study of four broad themes: Epistemology; Moral philosophy; Metaphysics of God; and Metaphysics of Mind. Students will develop and refine a range of transferable skills, such as the ability to ask penetrating questions, to analyse and evaluate the arguments of others and to present their own arguments clearly and logically.

Critical analysis, coherent thought, careful decision-making and clear presentation are important skills for Philosophy but also in themselves. They serve as valuable preparation for many careers.

At the end of the course it is hoped that each student will be able to think independently and will have a respect for reasoned argument. Many employers value flexibility of thought and the capacity of marshalling arguments in a coherent and compelling manner which this course offers. Students tend to follow a career in the following areas:

Law, Medicine, Accountancy, Commerce and Industry, Business Management, Journalism, Civil Service, Teaching, Politics, Research.

Philosophy is welcomed and valued by many professions.

COURSE CONTENT

Paper 1

Section 1: Epistemology

  • What is knowledge?
  • Perception as a source of knowledge
  • Reason as a source of knowledge
  • The limits of knowledge

Section 2: Moral Philosophy

  • Normative ethical theories
  • Applied ethics
  • Meta-ethics

Examination: 3 hours

100 marks 50% of A Level  

Paper 2

Section 3: Metaphysics of God

  • The concept and nature of ‘God’
  • Arguments relating to the existence of God
  • Religious language

Section 4: Metaphysics of Mind

  • What do we mean by ‘mind’?
  • Dualist theories
  • Physicalist theories
  • Functionalism

Examination: 3 hours

100 marks 50% of A Level

STYLE OF TEACHING/DETAILS OF ASSESSMENT

The teaching and learning strategies used during the course are intended to develop students’:

  • knowledge of a range of philosophical and ethical topics and texts;
  • understanding of the significance of the material studied, scholarship and experience, both past and present ability to express themselves clearly and logically in an intelligent argument and to make some attempt at critical evaluation.

This qualification is linear so students will sit all their exams at the end of the course.